April 2011


http://www.commarts.com/columns/favorite-fonts-done.html

A very nice solution and execution.

Chris Tarry is an accomplished author and a highly distinguished jazz musician. The challenge was to package his latest CD, Rest of the Story in a way that highlighted both of these talents and reflected the creativity of his work. Rethink Canada answered the brief by turning the packaging into a book of Tarry’s short stories. The illustrations first set the stage and draw the reader into the stories, while the album’s musical landscape completes the picture—and becomes the rest of the story. The thoughtfulness of Tarry’s work echos in every aspect of the packaging, from the detailed drawings to the foil lettering and silver ribbon marker and, as an extra twist, the CD lies at the bottom of a large die-cut hole in the book, mirroring the fall of the character from the cover illustration. (via Communication Arts)

Brilliant. A summer song.

Good stuff!!!

“Defamiliarize the ordinary.”

Badass.

http://www.totalfilm.com/features/50-best-summer-blockbusters

Beastie Boys stream new ‘Hot Sauce…’ album in full online – audio.

http://www.nme.com/news/beastie-boys–2/56320

It´s New York and Harlem in the midtwenties. At Cotton Club, a hornplayer named Dixie Dwyer (Richard Gere) is a up and rising star. To advance his career he starts to work for the wellknown gangster, Dutch Schultz (James Remar). Eventually he falls for Schultz mistress, Vera Cicero (Diane Lane) and ends up in between a gangland war. I remember when “Cotton Club” came out in 1984, and it has been on my must see list since then. Now I understand why it flopped. Despite being directed by Francis Ford Coppola and produced by Robert Evans, this doesn´t hold up at all. It´s just poor in the whole structure and I am not sure what went wrong. Bad performances, bad sound (looks like the voices were added in the post production) a limping storyline and a not succesful effort to be an homage to the classic gangster noir movie. My biggest joy in this movie came from watching my never lasting crush, Diane Lane and to see the magic of Gregory Hines tapdancing. (2 and a half out of 5)

“Skulls”, 1976 print series by Andy Warhol.

Next Page »