April 2014


It truly pleases me that Atlético Madrid won this eve. Time to crush Real Madrid in the final! #ChampionsLeagueFinal2014

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Sad to hear the passing of Bob Hoskins. Great actor.

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Author Donna Tartt has been awarded this year’s Pulitzer Prize for fiction for her critically acclaimed third novel The Goldfinch. The Secret History author said she was “incredibly happy and incredibly honoured” by the award.

Tartt’s 784-page bestseller The Goldfinch, which was named Amazon’s 2013 book of the year, is set in modern Manhattan and tells the story of a young orphan coming to terms with the death of his mother. Columbia University, which awards the prize, said judges described it as “a beautifully written coming-of-age novel … that stimulates the mind and touches the heart. The book, which is in the running for this year’s Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction in the UK, beat two other nominees, The Son by Philip Meyer and The Woman Who Lost Her Soul by Bob Shacochis. Fans of Tartt had waited a decade since her second novel The Little Friend, which many had found disappointing after her strong 1992 debut The Secret History.

“The only thing I am sorry about is that Willie Morris and Barry Hannah aren’t here,” said Tartt, referring to two authors who were her early mentors. “They would have loved this,” she added. Last month it was reported by The Wrap that a film version or TV series of The Goldfinch is in the works, by the producers behind The Hunger Games. (via BBC)

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Japanese design unit YOY have developed a rug with an aluminum center. When folded, it holds its shape, effectively transforming into a chair. Naoki Ono and Yuuki Yamamoto, the designer duo that comprises YOY, unveiled their new shape-shifting furniture at Milano Salone.

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In collaboration with Carnegie Mellon University’s Computer Club, New York-based artist Cory Arcangel has rediscovered digital paintings made by Andy Warhol on vintage floppy disks stored in the archives of the The Andy Warhol Museum.

These paintings were commissioned by Commodore International, who wanted to demonstrate the graphic arts capabilities of the Amiga 1000 personal computer. The quest to find these paintings started when Arcangel chanced upon a YouTube video of the Amiga product launch, where Warhol is seen using Amiga prototype hardware and imaging software to create his art.

As the famous pop artist has saved his data in completely unknown formats, it was a struggle to extract information from the disks—however, the team managed to pull out 28 digital images, of which 11 bears Warhol’s signature. (via DesignTaxi)

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