October 2014


Yeeeeessssss!!

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Beaut.

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Klas Inge “Klabbe” Ingesson (20 August 1968 – 29 October 2014) was a Swedish footballer and manager. He spent most of his career as a midfielder in Europe, mainly in Sweden, Belgium, Netherlands, England, Italy and France. Ingesson represented the Sweden national team on 57 occasions, including the 1990 and 1994 FIFA World Cup, as well as the 1992 European Championship. He was the manager of IF Elfsborg from 2013 to 2014 until his death in October 2014. RIP Klabbe.

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Installed earlier this month on the western coastline of New Providence in Nassau, Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas,” is the lastest underwater sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor, known for his pioneering effort to build submerged sculpture parks in oceans around the world. Taylor’s cement figures are constructed with a sustainable pH-neutral material that encourages the growth of coral and other marine wildlife, effectively forming an artificial reef that draws tourists away from diving hotspots in over-stressed areas.

Towering 18 feet tall and weighing in at more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas is reportedly the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater. The artwork depicts a local Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the ocean above her in reference to the Ancient Greek myth of Atlas, the primordial Titan who held up the celestial spheres. The piece was commissioned by B.R.E.E.F (Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation), as part of an ongoing effort to build an underwater sculpture garden in honor of its founder, Sir Nicholas Nuttal. (via Colossal)

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Designer Steve Wintercroft has a series of inexpensive geometric mask templates that you can download, print, and color. From animals and skulls to stormtroopers and faces. (via Colossal) This is pretty cool.

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Earlier this year Tokyo and Milan-based design firm Nendo accepted the challenge of redesigning the rubber band, one of the most common desktop items that seems so ubiquitous that it’s disposable. After all, the cost of a few hundred more is just a few bucks. But what if a rubber band was interesting, functional, and you didn’t want to throw it away. This was the idea behind Nendo’s cubic rubber band, a completely different form factor resulting in a desktop object that isn’t meant to be stashed away in a drawer or tossed in the trash. A set of three retails for 1080 yen (about $10), though you’ll need to be able to navigate a Japanese retailer, Marks, to snap up a set. (via Colossal)

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