MI6 sends James Bond (Pierce Brosnan), agent 007, into the field to spy on a terrorist arms bazaar on the Russian border. Via television, MI6 and the Royal Navy identify several wanted men, including American “techno-terrorist” Henry Gupta, who is buying a GPS encoder made by the U.S. military. Despite M’s insistence to let 007 finish his reconnaissance, British Admiral Roebuck launches a missile attack on the arms bazaar. Bond then discovers two Soviet nuclear torpedoes mounted on an L-39 Albatros, and as the missile is too far along to be aborted, 007 hijacks the L-39 and flies away seconds before the bazaar is struck. Amidst the confusion, Gupta escapes with the encoder. Media baron Elliot Carver (Jonathan Pryce), head of the Carver Media Group Network (CMGN), soon begins his plans to use the encoder to provoke war between China and the United Kingdom, hoping to replace the current Chinese government with one more supportive to Carver’s plans of exclusive broadcast rights in their country. Via a GPS signal by using the encoder, Gupta sends a British frigate, the HMS Devonshire, off-course into Chinese-held waters in the South China Sea, where Carver’s stealth ship, commanded by Mr. Stamper (Götz Otto), sinks the frigate with a sea drill and steals one of its missiles, while shooting down a Chinese J-7 fighter jet sent to investigate the British presence, and killing off the Devonshire’s survivors with Chinese weaponry. After reading a CMGN report of the incident as a Chinese attack, a government minister orders Roebuck to deploy the British Fleet to recover the frigate, and possibly retaliate, while leaving M only forty-eight hours to investigate its sinking. M sends Bond to investigate Carver, due to Carver Media releasing their news articles with critical details hours before the events had become known, along with MI6 noticing a spurious signal from one of his CMGN communications satellites when the frigate was sunk. Bond travels to Hamburg and seduces Carver’s trophy wife, Paris (Teri Hatcher), an ex-girlfriend, to get information that would help him enter Carver’s newspaper headquarters. After Bond steals back the GPS encoder, Carver orders Paris and Bond killed. Paris is killed by Dr. Kaufman, Mr. Stamper’s teacher on Chakra Torture, but Bond kills Kaufman and escapes, protecting the encoder. Bond, after visiting the Americans and learning that the encoder had been tampered with, goes to the South China Sea to investigate the wreck (which was actually in Vietnamese waters), discovering one of its cruise missiles missing. He and Colonel Wai Lin (Michelle Yeoh), a Chinese spy on the same case, after avoiding being trapped in the sunk ship, are captured by Stamper and taken to the CMGN tower in Ho Chi Minh City, but soon escape and decide to both collaborate on the investigation and bringing Carver to justice…

So, I`m continuing to re-see Pierce Brosnan´s years as James Bond and “Tomorrow Never Dies” was his second one coming out in 1997. In my opinion this is weaker than “GoldenEye” and “Tomorrow Never Dies” becomes a flat and massively overdriven/over-exaggerated affair in all areas, even for being a Bond movie. Brosnan is still stiff as Bond and he just doesn´t seem to fit in the tuxedo. The idea of putting focus on medias manipulation of the world is not bad, but Jonathan Pryce´s Elliot Carver (the psychopathic media mogul who plans to provoke global war in order to boost sales and ratings of his news divisions) is just not a stand out Bond bad guy that goes through the screen, but instead becomes a bi-figure in my point of view. The same goes for his henchman Mr. Stamper, who becomes a really poor action movie stereotypical bad guy. The lovely Teri Hatcher is wasted as Paris, as she gets hardly any screen time and gets killed very quickly. While Michelle Yeoh gets more screen time, and participate in a lot of the action sequences due to her martial arts background, her character never really takes off and there´s no sparks between her and Brosnan. However, my biggest issue with “Tomorrow Never Dies” is the fact that all actions sequences, more or less, are so over the top ridiculous and over-exaggerated (and this is still a Bond movie) that it ruins the whole movie. Yes, there´s always been some over the top stunts or sequences, particularly in Roger Moore´s Bond movies, but here it´s like director Roger Spottiswoode went into the candy shop and Eon Productions kept giving him more and more money to buy more and more candy. You are choking on all the ridiculous action sequences like a gigantic cotton candy stuck in your throat. Nah, “Tomorrow Never Dies” passes in my book as one of the less good Bond movies. (2 out of 5)

Tomorrow