Author


“Every Man Dies Alone” or “Alone in Berlin” (German: Jeder stirbt für sich allein) is a 1947 novel by German author Hans Fallada. It is based on the true story of a working class husband and wife who, acting alone, became part of the German Resistance. Fallada’s book was one of the first anti-Nazi novels to be published by a German after World War II.

The story takes place during World War II in 1940 in Berlin. The book conveys the omnipresent fear and suspicion engulfing Germany at the time caused by the constant threat of arrest, imprisonment, torture and death. Even those not at risk of any of those punishments could be ostracized and unable to find work. Escherich, a Gestapo inspector, must find the source of hundreds of postcards encouraging Germans to resist Adolf Hitler and the Nazis with personal messages such as “Mother! The Führer has murdered my son. Mother! The Führer will murder your sons too, he will not stop till he has brought sorrow to every home in the world.” Escherich is under pressure from Obergruppenführer Prall to arrest the source or find himself in dire straits. Nearly all those who find the cards turn them in to the Gestapo immediately, terrified they themselves will be discovered having them. Eventually, Escherich finds the postcard writer and his wife, who turn out to be a quiet, working class couple, Otto and Anna Quangel. The Quangels’ acts of civil disobedience were prompted by the loss of their only son, who has been killed in action. They are arrested and brought to trial at the Volksgerichtshof, the Nazi “People’s Court”, where the infamous Roland Freisler presides. The Quangels are sentenced to death; Otto is soon executed, but Anna dies during an Allied bombing raid, while still on death row. (via Wikipedia)

I red this book some months ago, and it´s hard to not get engaged in the storyline about the Quangels’ and their action towards the Nazis as a result due to the loss of their son. However, despite having a great story based on a true story, I still felt something didn´t strike me full on and left me longing to pick the book up and read and also feeling sad when the book was finished. Not sure why I felt that way. Nevertheless, it´s has a strong illustration of German resistance against the Nazis. In the autumn of 1946 Fallada wrote “Alone in Berlin” in just 24 days and died a few months later, weeks before the book was published. Sad that he didn´t get to see the success of the book years later.

Alone

“I urge you to travel as far and as widely as possible. Sleep on floors if you have to.”

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When I left for Sorrento in Italy I had to bring “The Story of San Michele” by Swedish physician Axel Munthe with me. A funny, strange and existential book of memoirs by Munthe. It was first published in 1929 and it became a best-seller in numerous languages and has been republished constantly in the over seven decades since its original release. Munthe spent much of his life on Capri building the Villa San Michele. A magnificent place on Capri you should visit. I will go back for sure. #Sorrento #Capri #AxelMunthe

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On October 25th, 2016 New York Times bestselling novelist and cultural trickster Chuck Palahniuk will publish Bait: Off-Color Stories for You to Color, his first ever coloring book for adults, this fall with Dark Horse Books. Bait will be both the coloring book debut and the second short story collection for Palahniuk, author of Lullaby and Fight Club. The book will contain eight bizarre tales, illustrated in detailed black and white by Joëlle Jones (Lady Killer), Lee Bermejo (The Suiciders), Duncan Fegredo (Hellboy), and more. Each story is paired with pieces of colorable original art, nearly 50 in all. Dark Horse Books will publish Bait: Off-Color Stories for You to Color as an 8.5 x 11 inch hardcover album, with uncoated and white interior paper stock, accompanied by a cover illustrated and colored by Duncan Fegredo and designed by Nate Piekos. (via http://chuckpalahniuk.net)

Gotta have.

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Albert Camus, 1957

http://www.esquire.co.uk/culture/books/6935/esquire-meets-bret-easton-ellis/

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