Fine Art


Love it.

Earlier this year, on the occasion of 23rd edition of Life Ball that took place in Vienna, photographer Inge Prader made incredible photographs in a tribute to Gustav Klimt’s Golden phase. The settings of Klimt’s iconic paintings were recreated with models specially dressed for Prader´s visual project. (via Fubiz)

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A native from south Florida, Jason Kowalski was raised in California where he used to study and graduated in Fine Art from Laguna College of Art and Design. The painter is specialized in oil paintings and draws his inspiration from landscapes, signage, roads and structures. (via Fubiz)

Japanese art director Tatsuya Tanaka ongoing miniature photo project, is now stretching into its fifth year. Tanaka uses office supplies, food, and other found objects that he utilizes as set pieces or backdrops for miniature inhabitants. You can see new images from the Miniature Calendar project every single day on Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal)

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Hawaii-native Sean Yoro, aka Hula, traditionally worked with paint on wood panels, until the day he combined his surfboarding skills and creative character, and took to the seas in search of street art-style canvasses. Instead of applying his paint to walls and surfaces in urban environments, hula made his way to abandoned spaces and untouched building façades only accessible by water. Carefully carrying cans of colored paint on the edge of his board, the now new york-based artist sources seaside locations in the creation of his most recent series of female portraits, half submerged in the surrounding water.

The series of artworks comprises four female portraits, each painted with a distinct hyper-realism. While their faces are painted on the wall, their bodies ‘hide’ under the water’s edge — the perfect placement for them to appear as if they are serenely floating in the surrounding abyss. The pool of water below reflects a semi-transparent image onto the surface, making the faces seem as if they are looking into a mirror. (via DesignBoom)

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Working only with layers of painted galvanized wire atop steel armature, UK artist Kendra Haste creates faithful reproductions of creatures large and small for both public installations and private collections around the world. A graduate of the from the Royal College of Art, Haste says she is fascinated by how such a seemingly ordinary medium, chicken wire, is capable of suggesting “the sense of movement and life, of contour and volume, the contrasts of weight and lightness, of solidity and transparency—values that I find in my natural subjects.” She continues about her work with animals:

What interests me most about studying animals is identifying the spirit and character of the individual creatures. I try to create a sense of the living, breathing subject in a static 3D form, attempting to convey the emotional essence without indulging in the sentimental or anthropomorphic.

In 2010, Historic Royal Palaces commissioned Haste to fabricate thirteen sculptures around the Tower of London that will remain on view through 2021. You can see much more in this online gallery, and as part of the Art and the Animal exhibition currently at the Ella Carothers Dunnegan Gallery of Art in Missouri. (via Colossal and Christopher Jobson)

Amazing!

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Installed earlier this month on the western coastline of New Providence in Nassau, Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas,” is the lastest underwater sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor, known for his pioneering effort to build submerged sculpture parks in oceans around the world. Taylor’s cement figures are constructed with a sustainable pH-neutral material that encourages the growth of coral and other marine wildlife, effectively forming an artificial reef that draws tourists away from diving hotspots in over-stressed areas.

Towering 18 feet tall and weighing in at more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas is reportedly the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater. The artwork depicts a local Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the ocean above her in reference to the Ancient Greek myth of Atlas, the primordial Titan who held up the celestial spheres. The piece was commissioned by B.R.E.E.F (Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation), as part of an ongoing effort to build an underwater sculpture garden in honor of its founder, Sir Nicholas Nuttal. (via Colossal)

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The artist Christopher Schulz decided to combine two dangerous objects, a firearm and a shark, one of the largest predators. The metal sculptures goes under the name “Surreal Shark Guns”.  (via Fubiz)

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