Europe is home to the Greek Parthenon in Athens, the Roman Colosseum in Rome, the Eiffel Tower in Paris and many, many more architectural masterpieces. You know what it’s lacking, though? An underwater restaurant. But a company called Snøhetta (previously here) is on a quest to change that. They have designed a three-level structure with a 36-foot-wide panoramic window that allows visitors to “journey” to the sea in southern Norway.

At first glance, “Under” looks like a concrete container, tossed into the shallows near the village Båly, but once inside it radiates life. The restaurant will have the space to fit up to 100 guests, and the building will even double as a marine research centre when no one is dining. “More than an aquarium, the structure will become a part of its marine environment, coming to rest directly on the sea bed five meters below the water’s surface,” Snøhetta writes. “Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive acrylic windows offer a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.”

Snøhetta hopes to begin construction next year, with the goal of opening in 2019. (via Bored Panda and Greta J.)

Love it.

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The Canadian branch of the Swedish furniture tycoon teamed up with Toronto-based marketing company Leo Burnett to create Cook This Page, an ingenious set of illustrated recipes which they unveiled at a recent IKEA Canada kitchen event. Each one displays drawings of the ingredients needed, and the prospective chef just has to fill in the blanks. The best part? They’re all printed on parchment paper using food-safe ink, so once everything is in place, the page can be rolled up and tossed in the oven.

http://www.boredpanda.com/ikea-cooking-recipe-posters/

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Three design students created the Polluted Water Popsicles project, which aims to raise awareness about rising water pollution due to rapid economic growth and urbanization. Water was taken from 100 different water sources in Taiwan and turned into frozen toxic popsicles before Hung I-chen, Guo Yi-hui, and Cheng Yu-ti from the National Taiwan University of Arts recreated them using transparent polyester resin. They even made wrappers for them that represented the different regions from which the polluted water samples were taken. While the trash in the water was varied, about 90 percent of it was plastic, and the popsicles contain everything from bottle caps and plastic bags to bottles and chopstick wrappers. (via Bored Panda)

http://www.boredpanda.com/polluted-water-popsicles-taiwan/

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Before we had Pantone Color Guide, there was no universally recognized system to identify colors. But there were attempts to make it, and probably the most impressive one came from the artist known only as A. Boogert, who back in 1692 created an impressive piece of literature about mixing colors.

Handwritten in Dutch, the “Traité des couleurs servant à la peinture à l’eau“ was an 800-page long guide on color and paint that was probably the most comprehensive piece on colors at the time. It featured color samples, descriptions and even instructions on how to create certain hues and change the tone by adding one, two, or three parts of water. (via Bored Panda)

http://www.boredpanda.com/271-years-before-pantone-800-page-color-book-guide-boogert/

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http://www.boredpanda.com/pilot-clouds-lightning-night-skies-santiago-borja-lopez/

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http://www.boredpanda.com/tv-logos-physical-objects/

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The 52nd annual ‘Wildlife Photographer of the Year’ (WPY) competition has recently released a preview of this year’s finalists. A curious fox in an urban area, a hungry hornbill eating a termite, mayflies swarming around under a starry night sky… These spectacular images and a few more stood out for the judges as the best of the best photograhy.

It all started in 1965. There were about 500 entries back then, but now, more than fifty years later, it attracted almost 50,000 of them from professionals and amateurs from 95 countries. All images are rated in three categories: originality, creativity, and technical excellence. The WPY52 exhibition will be on display from the 21st of October at Natural History Museum, London. (via Bored Panda)

http://www.nhm.ac.uk/visit/wpy.html

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