Set against the backdrop of the 1976 election in Sweden, the story is centred around delinquent teenager Iris (Sofia Karemyr), who is sent to live in a juvenile home. She meets her cousin Sonja (Josefin Asplund) there and the two regularly slip away for adventures in the city centre of Stockholm. Together they are recruited to the prostitution ring operated by Dagmar Glans (Pernilla August), a madam well-known to the authorities. Dagmar’s clients are mostly rich and powerful men, including senior politicians of the day. She becomes the subject of a police investigation lead by a young vice officer, John Sandberg (Simon J. Berger). Sandberg soon discovers Glans has powerful clients but also finds his investigation hampered by his superiors and his life threatened by sinister figures…

The story is a fictionalised version of events based on the so-called “Bordellhärvan” political scandal of 1970’s Sweden which linked several prominent politicians to a prostitution ring that included underage girls. Mikael Marcimain has managed to recreate the 70s down to details and that is the strength of the movie in combination with a good script and good acting from all involved. “Call Girl” is an ensemble film with known names such as Pernilla August, Magnus Krepper, David Dencik, Simon J. Berger, Ruth Vega Fernandez and Jennie Silverhjelm. However, it´s Sofia Karemyr and Josefin Asplund that really stands out portraying two girls with a need for love and a home. The undertones and general vibe creates a shady and depressing environment, and the storyline feels as current as ever unfortunately. I do like the whole “Watergate”ish conspiracy tone and the darkness presented. I firmly believe that these sort of stories is far more important to be told on the silver screen compared to something lighter or easier. “Call Girl” is a needed movie and the consequences we see needs to be addressed over and over. (4 out of 5)

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