When looking at a case of pastries in a bakery it’s usually possible to intuit what something might taste like because of its familiar shape or color. Such is not the case with these radically unusual cake designs by Ukrainian pastry chef Dinara Kasko whose experimental techniques result in edible objects unlike anything we’ve ever seen.
Most of her creations would look just fine sitting on a pedestal inside a contemporary art museum, but surprisingly everything you see here is completely edible. Kasko actively works math into her creations, incorporating principles like the Voroni method or utilizing 3D modeling and printing to create different cakes or silicone molds. If the cake shapes are unfamiliar, it might be easier to relate to some of the ingredients she uses like sponge cake, chocolate mousse, berry confit, shortcrust dough, and meringue. (via Colossal)

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Photographer Alex Ugalnikov ventures out into frozen early winter mornings to photograph fields and rivers covered in ice, snow, fuzzy layers of frost in his native Belarus. The clouds of white fog and trees covered in thick ice give the impression of infrared photography, but Ugalnikov tells us that what you see here is extremely close to reality with only minor color enhancements. Some of his best shots are wide panoramas of rivers near his home in Minsk. You can see more photography from the last few years on 35PHOTO and follow him on Instagram. (via Colossal)

Excellent work.

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Japanese art director Tatsuya Tanaka ongoing miniature photo project, is now stretching into its fifth year. Tanaka uses office supplies, food, and other found objects that he utilizes as set pieces or backdrops for miniature inhabitants. You can see new images from the Miniature Calendar project every single day on Instagram and Facebook. (via Colossal)

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Cristóbal Pérez García’s oil painted scenes are those found in twilight or dusk, landscapes encased in smog and the highly trafficked realities of living in an urban metropolis. The vantage points are those of the pedestrian, Garcia’s own view when embarking on a new city to paint. Garcia’s highly textured paintings give a nice balance to the blurred masses of city inhabitants and his detailed buses, cabs, and cars. Each painting also has an emphasis on light, either natural or the reflection of vehicle and traffic lights in the crowded streets.

Garcia was born in 1976 in Álora, Málaga and studied painting and sculpture at the Universidad de Granada, Spain. Garcia has upcoming exhibitions at Galería Mar from March 5-18, and Art Expo New York from April 23-26. You can see more of Garcia’s urban landscapes on his website and Twitter. (via Colossal and Kate Sierzputowski)

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Working only with layers of painted galvanized wire atop steel armature, UK artist Kendra Haste creates faithful reproductions of creatures large and small for both public installations and private collections around the world. A graduate of the from the Royal College of Art, Haste says she is fascinated by how such a seemingly ordinary medium, chicken wire, is capable of suggesting “the sense of movement and life, of contour and volume, the contrasts of weight and lightness, of solidity and transparency—values that I find in my natural subjects.” She continues about her work with animals:

What interests me most about studying animals is identifying the spirit and character of the individual creatures. I try to create a sense of the living, breathing subject in a static 3D form, attempting to convey the emotional essence without indulging in the sentimental or anthropomorphic.

In 2010, Historic Royal Palaces commissioned Haste to fabricate thirteen sculptures around the Tower of London that will remain on view through 2021. You can see much more in this online gallery, and as part of the Art and the Animal exhibition currently at the Ella Carothers Dunnegan Gallery of Art in Missouri. (via Colossal and Christopher Jobson)

Amazing!

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Installed earlier this month on the western coastline of New Providence in Nassau, Bahamas, “Ocean Atlas,” is the lastest underwater sculpture by artist Jason deCaires Taylor, known for his pioneering effort to build submerged sculpture parks in oceans around the world. Taylor’s cement figures are constructed with a sustainable pH-neutral material that encourages the growth of coral and other marine wildlife, effectively forming an artificial reef that draws tourists away from diving hotspots in over-stressed areas.

Towering 18 feet tall and weighing in at more than 60 tons, Ocean Atlas is reportedly the largest sculpture ever deployed underwater. The artwork depicts a local Bahamian girl carrying the weight of the ocean above her in reference to the Ancient Greek myth of Atlas, the primordial Titan who held up the celestial spheres. The piece was commissioned by B.R.E.E.F (Bahamas Reef Environment Educational Foundation), as part of an ongoing effort to build an underwater sculpture garden in honor of its founder, Sir Nicholas Nuttal. (via Colossal)

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Designer Steve Wintercroft has a series of inexpensive geometric mask templates that you can download, print, and color. From animals and skulls to stormtroopers and faces. (via Colossal) This is pretty cool.

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