Matt Murdock (Ben Affleck) is a blind lawyer who lives in New York City’s Hell’s Kitchen and runs a firm with his best friend Franklin “Foggy” Nelson (Jon Favreau), who only defends innocent people and does not require monetary payment. As a child, Matt (Scott Terra) was blinded after toxic waste was spilled over his eyes while he was taking a shortcut home from school after discovering that his father, former boxer Jack “The Devil” Murdock (David Keith), had become an enforcer for a local mobster. The accident, however, also enhanced his other senses and gave him a sonar that allowed him to “see” through sonic vibrations. Matt uses his sharpened senses to train himself in martial arts. His father, blaming himself for his disability, stopped being an enforcer and went back to boxing. However, his new career was short-lived and he was murdered after refusing to turn in a fixed fight by the same mobster that had employed him earlier. To avenge his father’s death, Matt used his abilities to become a crime-fighter known as “Daredevil”, who operates in Hell’s Kitchen, going after the criminals that escape the conventional means of justice. One day, Matt meets Elektra Natchios (Jennifer Garner). Elektra is the daughter of Nikolas Natchios (Erick Avari), a businessman that has dealings with Wilson Fisk (Michael Clarke Duncan), a rich executive who is also the criminal leader of New York City’s Underworld, known and feared as the Kingpin. When Nikolas tries to bail on his dealings with Fisk, the mobster hires the Irish hitman Bullseye (Colin Farrell), who never misses a shot, to kill him. Matt tries to stop Bullseye, even causing him to miss a shot, but Bullseye ultimately succeeds in killing Nikolas and framing Matt in the process. As a result, Elektra swears to take revenge on him as reporter Ben Urich (Joe Pantoliano), who had been investigating Matt’s activities, discovers his secret identity. Believing Matt to have done good things for Hell’s Kitchen, he tells Matt that Bullseye will be going after Elektra next. Matt goes after Bullseye, but is attacked by Elektra, who plans to use her extensive training in martial arts to avenge her father’s death by killing Matt. After wounding him, she removes his mask, and discovers his secret identity and innocence. Forced to fight Bullseye alone, Elektra is overpowered and murdered by the hitman, who is forced to flee before he can kill Matt as the police arrive, having been tipped off by Urich. Matt, wounded, makes his way to a local church, where he is looked after by his confidant Father Everett (Derrick O’Connor), who knows his secret identity. Matt will need to battle Bullseye and take down The Kingpin in his wounded state…

I have always loved Daredevil as a superhero, and I reckon I haven´t red enough comics of this superhero. Nevertheless, this effort to put Daredevil on the screen fails in most areas as the “The Green Lantern” did. The New York Times?’ Elvis Mitchell, said the film was “second-rate and ordinary,” while Variety’s Todd McCarthy considered it “a pretender in the realm of bona fide superheroes.” Slate’s David Edelstein believed Johnson copied a lot of Batman, and concluded by saying “that’s not so bad: The movie looks best when it looks like other, better movies. The New York Post’s Lou Lumenick panned the film, describing it as a “mind-numbing, would-be comic-book franchise, which often seems as blind as its hero — not to mention deaf and dumb”. Ben Affleck is awful as Matt Murdock/Daredevil and so is Colin Farrell as Bullseye (his “costume” as Bullseye is awful as well). The stunning Jennifer Garner is ok as Elektra and that goes for Michael Clarke Duncan as Wilson Fisk/Kingpin as well. The problem is that the production team and the director has created something that is still in the realms of a comic book with too much of a comic book feeling and they have tried to set it in a real up to date environment. So, it becomes neither, which makes everything look “dodgy” and unreal. The characters are too much stereotypical superheros/super villains and that create an unbalance as well. Plus the many too obvious green screen/ animated backgrounds and the really poorly animations of the characters in action adds to the overdriven comic book feeling. It´s a shame that this is simply not good, because Daredevil is a great comic book hero. However, there´s room for a reboot that can save Daredevils honour… (2 out of 5)

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