Europe is home to the Greek Parthenon in Athens, the Roman Colosseum in Rome, the Eiffel Tower in Paris and many, many more architectural masterpieces. You know what it’s lacking, though? An underwater restaurant. But a company called Snøhetta (previously here) is on a quest to change that. They have designed a three-level structure with a 36-foot-wide panoramic window that allows visitors to “journey” to the sea in southern Norway.

At first glance, “Under” looks like a concrete container, tossed into the shallows near the village Båly, but once inside it radiates life. The restaurant will have the space to fit up to 100 guests, and the building will even double as a marine research centre when no one is dining. “More than an aquarium, the structure will become a part of its marine environment, coming to rest directly on the sea bed five meters below the water’s surface,” Snøhetta writes. “Like a sunken periscope, the restaurant’s massive acrylic windows offer a view of the seabed as it changes throughout the seasons and varying weather conditions.”

Snøhetta hopes to begin construction next year, with the goal of opening in 2019. (via Bored Panda and Greta J.)

Love it.

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Founded by Nicolai Schaanning Larsen, a multi-tasking central st. Martins graduate who has now also taken on retail, the YME store concept is inspired by directional emporiums such as London’s Dover street market, Colette in Paris and Milan’s 10 Corso Como, and not only sets new retail standards nationwide, but also for the entire nordic region. Schaanning Larsen has a trained eye for aesthetics, design and style – or dare we say beauty as a whole? – and enlisted acclaimed architecture practice Snøhetta to collaborate on his bold retail vision. The name YME is symbolically based on a character – a jotun or giant – in norse mythology, and very much reflects the can-do attitude that now prevails in Oslo’s creative circles.

Occupying a whopping 1,600 sqm. [17,222 sq.ft.] spread over three floors of a mid-19th century building, YME is also an integral part of paleet, a drastically revamped shopping complex we talked about in a previous post. But then again, the store is conceptualized so differently, it’s visually almost an entity of its own. Schaanning Larsen clearly aims for the stars, and he has all the attributes to pull it off. YME entices shoppers with beautifully designed settings for its offerings, each one brimming with tightly curated goods, ranging from men’s + women’s apparel, shoes and accessories, to bags, fragrances and select furniture pieces.

Situated on the third floor is a café annex bookshop, stocked with relevant books and magazines from across the planet, while the rooftop terrace offers a lush green getaway. Needless to say, this is a place where to splurge, and the shelves are laden with relevant fashion brands to make that happen. YME‘s current brand list features a cool mix of high-end and premium labels, including maison martin margiela, nike, dior homme, opening ceremony and lanvin, and the majority are exclusive to the store. Adding up to the extraordinary shopping experience are exhibitions, product launches, book signings and other events. (via Retail Design Blog)

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